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The FactCheckHub verify information whether text or visual or audio uttered or shared in public spaces or public mediums like social media, TV, Radio and so on. Such information could be from government officials – elected and non-elected, celebrities, public figures, interest groups and so on. To avoid verifying opinions we ask if the claim – text, audio, video, statement – is based on verifiable fact. The claim must be one that is capable of leaving a particular impression that may be misleading to members of the public. It must also be of significance. The claim must be something likely to be shared by others. It must be something that would make an average person wonder if it is true or not.

As an independent non-profit media organisation, the FactCheckHub is deliberate and strategic while sourcing for claims. Social media platforms serve as major sources of claims, whether it is true or false. These assertions can come in form of tweets on Twitter, Facebook posts, WhatsApp viral messages and lots more. Claims from speeches and posts on Instagram and YouTube accounts, websites and blogs are also a good sources for claims. We are mindful of trending claims and those that have generated reactions, using our social media monitoring tools. Beyond these strategies, the FactCheckHub reaches out to different groups on social media to present suspected claims, misinformation and unverified information considered untrue or misleading. In sourcing these claims, however, we try to ensure that unpopular claims or tweets shared by individuals with insignificant followers are archived but not fact-checked immediately. This is to deliberately avoid amplifying claims that do not have potential to spread fast. We also encourage readers to suggest claims via email to [email protected] and a dedicated WhatsApp number; we often fact-check statements submitted by the readers, after selecting the most significant ones among them.

As an independent non-profit media organisation, the FactCheckHub is deliberate and strategic while sourcing for claims. Social media platforms serve as major sources of claims, whether it is true or false. These assertions can come in form of tweets on Twitter, Facebook posts, WhatsApp viral messages and lots more. Claims from speeches and posts on Instagram and YouTube accounts, websites and blogs are also a good sources for claims. We are mindful of trending claims and those that have generated reactions, using our social media monitoring tools. Beyond these strategies, the FactCheckHub reaches out to different groups on social media to present suspected claims, misinformation and unverified information considered untrue or misleading. In sourcing these claims, however, we try to ensure that unpopular claims or tweets shared by individuals with insignificant followers are archived but not fact-checked immediately. This is to deliberately avoid amplifying claims that do not have potential to spread fast. We also encourage readers to suggest claims via email to [email protected] and a dedicated WhatsApp number; we often fact-check statements submitted by the readers, after selecting the most significant ones among them.

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